Tuesday, 18 November 2008

Young people to be proud of...

Remembrance Day is always special and it is something I have always been passionate about.

Both my grandfathers were in the Second World War, (my maternal grandfather was very affected by being the only survivor from his boat to Normandy and my paternal grandfather was one of the liberation team at Bergen Belsen).

Going back a bit further, my parent's house is named 'Ashton' after my great aunt's brother who was killed at Mons (IIRC), we had a cousin imprisoned in the first world war who died in Cologne and my Mum has just given me the medals of my Great Uncle Nathan to look after.

Indeed my father was born in Braintree during WW2 as the family had been evacuated out of London.

So, for all these reasons and more recognising the signiicance of this small act of remembrance each year matters. So the Hampstead Cemetary service - co-ordinated by St Lukes - is a great, personal and relevant service for the local community.

Last year we arranged for puils from UCS to lay a wreath and this year we had four pupils from UCS and Hampstead Schools to lay wreaths. It was a very special and quite emotional service - a tribute to those pupils, those schools and very special for many of the older folks who were present to see the next generations playing their part.

Hampstead Cemetary is special because not only does it has the war memorial, but it also has the civillian memorial - (pictured right).

To see any of these pictures closer just double click and they should open up on your screen.

It all confirms my hopes for society and gives confidence in our young people.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I sadly believe the young people we can be proud of are in a minority.

Most of them are thieving, rude, out of control little shites - as a local resident, I speak from unfortunate experience.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for this. I attended this service for the first time this year. I've always been a bit uncertain about what to remember. Many of my Austrian Jewish father's family were taken to concentration camps, while my mother's German family died fighting in Hitler's armies. Both my parents have spent their lives trying to forget and making a new life here in England. I expect many of us who live in this area have similar complex, even confusing backgrounds. For me, it was the vicar's prayer that we should be part of making peace that stood out. I hope we can live up to that.

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